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Breaking News of Interest

Daedalians Hear From F-16 Fighter Pilot About AF Careers

Major Mat “Sled” Park, a combat-experienced F-16 Viper fighter pilot, now an instructor at Holloman AFB, in NM, spoke to the Flight 24 Daedalians of El Paso, Texas, about the current life of an Air Force fighter pilot, and of the possible future of his profession as we begin our merge into the 6th Generation of U. S. Fighter aircraft.  He also extolled the exciting and rewarding life of both a fighter pilot – – – and a career in the USAF.  Almost uniquely, it happens that “Sled’s” wife, Danielle, is also an F-16 Viper instructor pilot at Holloman.  They met while on duty in Japan, married, and now have two children.  The Air Force arranges for them to serve together.

Colonel Mario Campos

Here’s Major Park’s story, told by Daedalian Flight Captain, Colonel Mario Campos – at left. (All members of the Flight 24 are also long-time members of the FASF):

Maj Mathew “Sled” Park grew up in Phoenix, Arizona with his two brothers. His father served as an F-16 pilot for 20 years and his mother put up with their video games, fights, and affinity for getting into trouble. He often went on long backpacking or motorcycle trips with his brothers, exploring the varied terrain of the Southwestern United States.

 

       Maj. “SLED” Park

Sled went to the USAF Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado in 2007 where he dreamed of becoming a fighter pilot . . . until the Air Force determined he was not medically qualified to fly fighter planes. Disheartened but not defeated, he elected to learn Russian and major in Eastern European geopolitical studies in order to work as an intelligence officer in the USAF and eventually at the state department. A last-minute Hail Mary waiver allowed him to attend UPT at Sheppard AFB, TX where he tracked his first choice (F-16s) in 2012.

After graduating from UPT and IFF in 2013, he went to Luke AFB, Arizona, and graduated from the F-16B course at the 309th Fighter Squadron (QQMF), which was coincidentally the same fighter squadron from which his father had retired. His first assignment took him to Misawa, Japan, home of the PACAF Wild Weasel Block 50 F-16s. He deployed in 2015 as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, where he flew 376 combat hours in support of friendly troops and experienced firsthand the atrocities committed by ISIS on the people of Iraq, Kurdistan, and Syria.

He returned to Misawa, completed the Flight Lead Program, went on way too many TDYs and exercises across the PACAF theater, and eventually returned to the United States to learn to become an instructor pilot at Holloman AFB, NM.  It was there that he married his wife, Major Danielle Park, USAF, also an F-16 pilot, but not a better one, (if you ever ask him). The couple quickly had two children and transferred to the USAF Reserves as a full-time instructor pilot after 5 years on active duty in the Regular Air Force in New Mexico.

Sled and his wife (below photo on a mountainside) live in the mountain resort town of Cloudcraft, NM, and primarily spend their time exploring the state with their children and dogs on various camping, climbing, sailing, and hiking trips.

                                                       Sled and Danielle love mountain climbing

Sled and his wife were recently hired by the Air National Guard (ANG) in January of 2023 and intend to move to the Midwest, where they will continue to fly SEAD (Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses) missions and assist their unit with regular alert responsibilities.

Getting things set up for the meeting: L to R: Col. Alan Fisher, and Sled Park chatting with Connie Sullivan

Flight Captain Colonel Mario Campos sets the Daedalian Shield up for the gathering.

Newly retired Flight Captain Col. Alan Fisher delivered the Daedalipan Flight’s Shield for display at the meeting.

Colonel Bob Pitt was interrupted for the photo shoot while talking with Connie Sullivan at his right.  In the background are Colonel Campos speaking with Major “SLED” Park, the meeting’s guest speaker.

L to R: Foreground: Col Mario Campos, Connie Sullivan, Virg Hemphill, and Roger Springstead, in the rear with backs to the camera are: Ulla Rice, Major Park, Col. Fisher, and AFROTC students  Adam Hernandez, Maximilian Rothblatt – – – at the rear, facing camera: Jerry Dixon, Cliff Bossie, Judy Campos, Melissa Fisher, AFROTC students,
Jorge Villalobos
and Lyn Salas

L to R: Cols Bob Pitt and Mario Campos

Colonel Campos introduces the guest speaker, Major Mat “SLED” Park

Colonel Campos presents Major Park with his token of the Flight’s appreciation.

(L to R) Col. Mario Campos, Adam Hernandez, Maximilian Rothblatt, Jorge Villalobos, Lyn Salas, Maj. Mat ‘Sled’ Park, and Ric Lambart Photo by  Col. Alan Fisher

 

 

 

Will This Radical New Petro Engine Impact Global Aviation?

Remember the revolutionary “Rotary Engine” with which MAZDA Automotive toyed so unsuccessfully?  They launched their first rotary-powered autos back in 1967 using the revolutionary new non-reciprocating (non-conventional) power plant invented in the early 1950s by German engineer Felix Wankel.

The engine was truly unique: It had very few moving parts when compared to the conventional piston-engined autos of the day: It was not just simpler in design, but much smaller, lighter per horsepower output, and smoother in operation, BUT more costly and inefficient in respect to fuel economy than the conventional engines with which it competed.  There were so many issues with the Rotary Engine over its years of production, that Mazda, in 2012, dropped its use altogether in its production lineup.

But, today, the entire future of the basic rotary engine appears to be showing amazing new possibilities altogether, the direct result of a relatively new R & D firm located in Bloomfield, Connecticut called LIQUIDPISTON. Its new Rotary hybrid cycle engine is called the “X-Mini.” Its new rotary X-Mini engine employs a patented Thermodynamic Cycle. Instead of the hundreds of parts involved in producing power in a conventional piston engine, the X-Mini has only two (2) principal moving parts.  LiquidPiston boasts 10 times more power-to-weight ratio with a 30% greater overall efficiency when compared to conventional piston engines.

A Honda single-cylinder 49cc piston engine alongside a 70cc X-mini Rotary Engine

A standard 35 HP diesel engine (left) next to LiquidPiston’s 40HP diesel engine (right)

The engine is capable of using a variety of different fuels, including modern Jet A (aviation) or JB-8 fuel, ordinary diesel, as well as other grades of popular gasoline. In short, this reinvented Wankel rotary has apparently overcome the many problems of its predecessors.  It employs what LIQUIDPISTON calls “compression ignition,”  which is how standard diesel engines obtain their power . . . without the need for spark plugs.  The company has moved through three (3) prototypes of its unique engine, all proof-of-principle motors, models 1X, 2X, and 4X. These models have been made in two horse-power rated configurations: 40 and 70 HP.

Here are two versions of the Mini-X engine: The one on the left is air-cooled and at right is a liquid-cooled version.

The firm is proud of its ability to obtain a 1.5 HP per Pound ratio, which is remarkable by any measure. since typical general aviation aircraft powerplants are only seen as obtaining 0.68 HP per Pound ratios. – – – or, in another way of perceiving the difference: LIquidPiston’s X-Minis are more than twice as powerful per pound of engine weight than are their conventionally powered piston competitors.  The U. S. Army has already awarded a contract to the young company for power supply units for some of the artillery weapons (see the below photo).

The Compact Artillery Power System (CAPS) generator unit powers the digital fire control system on an M777 Howitzer artillery piece.

Clearly, the below video shows how the Army and Marine Corps might also see fit to use the LiquidPiston-powered new hybrid (Rotary AND Electric powered) drones.

The below short video (4:04 minutes) shows LIQUIDPISTON’s new Rotary powered Drone in Flight.  Remember to open the video to full or hi-resolution size by clicking the small Full Size icon in the lower right of the image.

WU’s Dr. Hernandez Lectures CHS About Mexican Revolution

The Columbus Historical Society (CHS) just kicked off the new year with a detailed presentation by Professor Andy Hernandez of Western New Mexico University (WNMU).  This event was the first held under the newly elected officers and drew an audience from not just Columbus, but also from Deming, NM.  The event’s presenter was arranged by Dr. Kathleen Martin, the Society’s Historian.

The entire: 35-minute PowerPoint presentation by Dr. Hernandez is included below, as are some photos taken at the event.  The lecture focused on some aspects of what took place during the raid on Columbus, which entailed the First Aero Squadron’s engagement in the Punitive Expedition, but focused primarily on the overall dynamics of the then-ongoing Mexican Revolution, particularly as to its impact on South Texas, but of course included the Mexican rebel leaders, one of which was Pancho Villa, whose raid on Columbus caused the deployment of the First Aero Squadron in what became known as the Punitive Expedition. That expedition was instigated as the direct result of President Woodrow Wilson’s orders to bring Pancho Villa back – – – either dead or alive.

The Title of Dr. Hernandez’s presentation was:

THE PLAN DE SAN DIEGO: Insurgency and Violence in South Texas During the Mexican Revolution. *  See the end of the post for a PDF copy of Dr. Hernandez’s paper on this topic.

Dr. Hernandez explained at the outset that the title had nothing to do with San Diego, CA, but rather a small Texas town of the same name.  Many Mexican revolutionaries, including some Tejanos, were in hopes of regaining – or returning – depending upon which side of the Tex-Mex border they lived, much of the then-current U.S. Southwestern territories that were previously part of their homeland.

The Plan de San Diego was actually a bold manifesto that called for an uprising against the United States government on the 20th of February, 1915.  The document was, in essence, a call for racial strife and chaos in order to help facilitate the return of the Southwestern U. S. to Mexico.

Some of the most violent characteristics of the plot were the intended killing of North Americans over the age of sixteen to free the Black and Hispanic population from “Yankee tyranny.”  Needless to say, as Dr. Hernandez illustrated, while he turned the pages of the era’s history for his audience, this HIstpanic-American call for wanton violence and mayhem created massive distrust among many neighbors in Texas itself – – – and threw the state into all sorts of internal political turmoil.

Fortunately for Texas, a copy of the plot’s plan was uncovered before it could take effect, enabling the Governor of Texas, then Oscar Colquitt to take remedial action to thwart the planned insurrection.  His successor in office, Governor James Ferguson, was left to deal with the continued political duress and strife that the Plan de San Diego triggered.

Even the Texas Rangers entered the dynamic, and demonstrated their own brand of corruption and racist behavior, seriously tarnishing their reputation. Some of these Rangers wantonly murdered hundreds of often innocent Mexican-Americans solely based upon their ethnicity.

Another key figure in the tensions and actual violence in the pre-WWI period in the border region was Army General, Frederick Funston, who in 1914 took over the Army occupation forces in Vera Cruz, Mexico, and soon began the serious job of administering the city. This was no small chore because that Mexican port city was known for being an unsanitary and disease-ridden metropolis.  As soon as the U. S. withdrew from Vera Cruz, General Funston repositioned his troops on the Texas, New Mexican, and Arizona borders to protect the states from any spillover from the ongoing turmoil of the by-then full-blown Mexican Revolution.

In time, so much Texas economic and social turmoil had resulted from the exposure of the violent Plan de San Diego, and its plot’s instigators and followers, that the Federal government took remedial action to quell the chaos by the assignment of the U.S. Army and some of its National Guard troops to the area to help restore law and order: ie General Funston’s major role.  When General “Black Jack” Pershing was later given command of the Punitive Expedition, his direct commander was Gen. Funston.

Although the Plan de San Diego plot did not fulfill its intended purposes, it did leave the area with significant scars in regard to much worsened interracial and Anglo-American vs Tejano relations for many years to come.  There was still active segregation in Texas well into the mid-1960s.  Your webmaster lived there for several years and remembers this blight all too well.

To see any of the below photos in high resolution or full size, just click on them.

Dr. Kathleen Martin introduces Professor Andy Hernandez to the audience. Watching at right are, Steven Zobeck, seated, and Shirley Garber, the CHS’s new President.

Seated above as Dr. Hernandez readied to give his presentation are, L to R: Jim Tyo, Steven Zobeck, Ron Wize, Gordon Taylor, Librarian Maria Constantine, Retired Luna County Chamber of Commerce Director, Mary Galbraith, Columbus Vice Mayor Bill Johnson,  Carol Crumb, Shirley Garber, and Daniella Sandoval.

      Dr. Andy Hernandez describes some further reading for those interested in following up on his lecture’s topic.

      Professor Hernandez answers some questions about his citation of recommended additional reading sources.

Center in the cap, Steven Zobeck asks Dr. Hernandez some questions . . . Marilyn Steffen at left in a gray jacket, and Shirley Garber, at far right, listens intently to Steven’s query about the German role in the Revolution.

Dr. Hernandez experienced an especially attentive audience of history enthusiasts, without one person not paying full attention to his flow of often newly encountered historical facts about the Mexican Revolution – – –  and its effect on the U.S.

Dr. Hernandez produced more references for his audience for those who would like to continue their research into this subject of the Mexican Revolution and its profound effect on our border states, in particular South Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona.

The New CHS Leadership officially thanks the season’s first speaker.  L to R above: Leonard Steward, Treasurer; Jim Tyo, VP; Daniella Sandoval, Secretary; Dr. Andy Hernandez; Dr. Kathleen Martin, Historian; and new the CHS President, Shirley Garber.

Click on the lower right-hand corner ‘FullScreen’ icon to see the video in its full size

THE PLAN DE SAN DIEGO -They Will Bring Trouble On Themselves [PDF]

(Scroll down to the 3rd page, which is the first page of Dr. Hernandez’s article.)

DAEDALIAN FLIGHT 24, ALL FASFers, TEST NEW LOCATION

A few days ago, at their monthly meeting, the Daedalian Flight 24, all long-time members of the FASF, tried out a new meeting location in picturesque downtown historic El Paso, Texas.  They had most recently been convening at the Ft. Bliss Golf Club but missed the elegance and efficiency of the old El Paso Club, which was also downtown.

The Daedalians had held their regular monthly meetings at the El Paso Club for some 37 years, but it was closed because of the COVID pandemic and has not yet re-opened.  In the meantime, the group decided to try the historic ANSON ELEVEN restaurant as a substitute gathering facility.  The ANSON is dedicated to the memory of General Anson Mills, who built the building in which the restaurant (named in his honor) is located, back in 1911, thus the number after his first name of Eleven.  Interestingly, General Mills was the actual designer of El Paso as a city, drafting the plans back in the late 19th Century while stationed at Ft. Bliss.  General Mills, after retiring from the U.S. Army, became an extremely successful entrepreneur and millionaire.

Below are a few photos taken of the Daedalian Meeting (Click any picture for hi-resolution):

L to R above: Early arrivals; Col. Bob Pitt, Julie Pitt, Connie Sullivan, Marian Diaz, Josiane Solana, Gerry Wingett, Roger Springstead, Jerry Dixon, Col. Mario Campos, and Judy Campos, Virg Hemphill, and Kathleen Martin.

L to R above: Marian Diaz, Josiane Solana, Gerry Wingett, Roger Springstead, Jerry Dixon, Col. Mario Campos (Flight Captain), Judy Campos, Virg Hemphill, and Dr.Kathleen Martin.

L to R above members and guests watching “An American Love Affair” about the Curtiss Jenny . . . Mariana Diaz, Josiane Solana, Gerry Wingett, Roger Springstead, Jerry Dixon, Melissa, and Alan Fisher . . .

Clockwise from lower R: Mariana Diaz, Josiane Solana, Gerry Wingett, Roger Springstead, Jerry Dixon, Julie Pitt, Melissa Fisher, Cols. Alan Fisher and Mario Campos, Judy Campos and Ulla Rice . . .

Wouldn’t This Be A Neat Christmas Treat for Aviation Lovers?

            Mike Mangino

The following story is a courtesy tip from Mike Mangino (at left), an Architect from Phoenix, AZ, and an aviation news scout for the FASF.

Mike served in the USAF’s Arizona Air National Guard, so knows his way around the aviation world.

This post is what’s behind a great book for any aviation buff and enthusiast’s Christmas list, albeit a tad late for on-time delivery for your stocking-stuffing ceremony.  Here’s the scoop: The book is written by a highly successful former US Marine Corps fighter pilot named Bob Moriarty, who later became an investment guru as well as an author.

Here’s a short introduction to Bob’s background:

Bob Moriarty was a Marine F-4B pilot at the age of only twenty and a veteran of over 820 missions in Viet Nam. Becoming a Captain in the Marines at just 22, he was one of the most highly decorated pilots in the war.

He went on to ferry General Aviation aircraft all over the world for 15 years with over 240 over-the-water deliveries. He holds 14 International Aviation records including Lindbergh’s record for time between New York to Paris in two different categories.

In 1996 he began an online computer business on the internet with his wife Barbara becoming one of the early adopters of the Internet. Convinced gold and silver were at a bottom in 2001, Bob and Barbara started one of the first websites devoted to teaching readers what they need to know about investing in resource stocks. They now operate two resource sites, 321Gold.com and 321Energy.com where up to 100,000 people a day visit. Bob travels to dozens of mining projects a year and then writes about them.

Now, here’s more background from a post on his own investment site, “321gold” along with a photo and promo for his book:

REMEMBER TO CLICK ON ANY PHOTO TO SEE IT FULL-SIZE IN HI-RESOLUTION

  No Guts No Glory Cover

I’ve done a lot of things in my life. My readers on 321Gold do not know all of them. From 1974 until 1986 I delivered new small planes to destinations all over the world. I mean little tiny, sometimes Cessna 172 size planes, to places from South Africa or Australia or Europe. We would pick them up from the factory, load them with internal fuel tanks, and off we went.

One of aircraft Bob ferried.

My 243 international trips over every ocean included breaking Lindberg’s New York to Paris record in two different categories, setting a Paris to New York speed record, flying in, and winning four different air races. I got a guy across the Atlantic standing on top of an airplane in 1980 and made a flight through the Eiffel Tower in 1984. (See photo below, too).

 

   Moriarty Flies Under Eiffel Tower

Delivering small planes over big oceans was easily the most dangerous job in the world. Every year about ten percent of ferry pilots were killed one way or another. When I was doing it, the aviation industry was booming with almost 20,000 aircraft manufactured a year. There were never more than fifty pilots in the world at one time who made a living delivering small general aviation aircraft.

Alas, a lawsuit after a preventable accident in 1979 literally killed the industry that used to provide ten percent of US exports by dollar value. I point out in the book that the dollar was dropping so fast for a decade that an owner could buy an aircraft, fly it for five years and sell it for more than he paid for it. For a short period in aviation history owning a small plane was an investment rather than an expense.

I got to fly with some of the best pilots in aviation history as well as a bunch of skirt-chasing quasi-drunks barely capable of taking off much less landing safely. I will say that without exception the 5-10% of ferry pilots who were women were across the board more professional and better pilots than the males.

I actually wrote this book about thirty-five years ago and frankly because I am lazy at heart, I never got around to proofreading and editing the book. But both Lulu and Amazon now have the ability to produce a professional-looking hardback book for anyone who can create a document file, I finally got off my ass and finished it.

I’ve done about ten books in the last decade ranging from short very funny fiction set in Cornwall for Barbara to serious tomes on combat and investing. This book, No Guts, No Glory, is one that most people interested in aviation and aviation history will find engaging. It’s a great gift for anyone interested in one of the most unusual areas of aviation history.

It’s only $19.99 and frankly in today’s world that is cheap for a good hardback. If you wouldn’t enjoy reading an aviation adventure story told by someone who lived it, you probably know someone who would appreciate it.

Order No Guts, No Glory – – – right here.

AND: HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS!

FASF/Daedalians, Cite Top Leader of New 8th Fighter Class

Once again, the El Paso Daedalian Flight attended the graduation of ten new VIPER fighter pilots at Holloman AFB (HAFB), Alamogordo, NM on Saturday, the 3rd of December.  Colonel Mario Campos did the honors.  Here are your members at the event.          Remember:

[Just click on any photo to see it in full size and resolution]

Daedalian Flight Captain Lt. Colonel Alan Fisher chats with Mrs. Sarah Rich.

Colonels Miles “Cowboy” Crowell pours some iced tea, Col. Mario Campos is facing the camera, and Col. Bob Pitt is standing and holding the blue folder.

L to R Clockwise: Mrs. Starlyn and husband, Lt. Col. Dale “RAM” Weller, Mrs. Lindsi and L/Col John “Atari” Harris, Captain Nicholas and Mrs. Sarah Rich, and our own Lt. Col. Alan Fisher.  Your editor took the photo.,

                        Squadron Commander, Lt. Colonel  George Normandin welcomes the graduates and guests

                 Lt. Colonel (Ret.) Scott A. Fredrick, the ceremony’s Guest Speaker, starts his talk.

Our Colonel Mario Campos congratulates Squadron Commander, Lt. Colonel George Normandin who stood in for the Leadership Award’s winner, Captain Dennis “FARM” Cook, who was absent to attend his sister’s wedding.

Left, Colonel Miles “COWBOY’ Crowell congratulates the Winner of the Red River Rat awardee, Lt. Nathan “BOOM” Nuveman.

COWBOY” AND “BOOM” pose with the award

8th Fighter Squadron’s new Graduates, Class 22-BBH -L to R: Lt. John ‘STATUS’ Bove; Lt. Trey ‘TABLE’ Alexander; Capt. Kyle ‘TATER’ Cline; Lt. Thomas ‘MORTY’ Toscano; Lt. Spencer ‘NAATY’ Prather; Lt. Nathan ‘BOOM’ Nuveman; Lt. Samuel ‘LENNY’ Valleroy; Lt. Logan ‘FULL’ Frost; and Lt. Ryan ‘FANI’ Walsh

FASF/Daedalians pose with the Squadron CO LC. George Normandin ( at L) and Guest Speaker, at the rear, Ret. LC Scott Fredrick.  Daedalian/FASF members L to R are Col. Mario Campos, Col. Miles Crowell, Col. Bob Pitt, and Daedalian Flight 24’s Captin, Col. Alan Fisher.  Photos by Ric Lambart

 

Colonel Steve Watson Shows the B-24 Liberator’s WWII Role

Colonel Bob Pitt

Colonel Bob Pitt, USAF Retired, at left, a long-time FASF member, and Daedalian Flight 24 Officer, a former jet fighter pilot from the Viet Nam conflict, wrote up this post.  Colonel Pitt has written up each El Paso Daedalian Society meeting in El Paso for more than 27 years, so he thinks that it’s time for him to retire from the responsibility. We will miss his colorful yet accurate reporting more than we can describe.

 

LC Steve Watson – 12/01/22

Lt Col Steve Watson, USAF (Ret) (R) returned on 1 December 2022 two years after he briefed the 24th Flight on his father’s service as a B-24 pilot in WWII. On this occasion, Steve gave a PowerPoint presentation on an upcoming B-24 Memorial.  Steve was commissioned in October 1974 and graduated from Undergraduate Navigator Training in October 1975.  He was qualified in five different C-130 models and logged over 3100 flight hours over 12 years as a flight crew member.

Steve began his presentation by briefly reviewing his father’s career during WWII. His father flew 30 missions in the B-24 as a lead pilot – flying his first mission in October 1944 and his last in April 1945, earning both the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal during his tour.

Steve then showed a photograph of the B-24 Memorial at the US Air Force Academy (L below) and then went on to speak of the history of Wendover Army Airfield in Utah which was the home to B-17, B-24, and later, B-29 training. Wendover also supported the Manhattan Project which developed the first atomic weapons to be used in combat via B-29s.

B-24 Liberator Monument at USAF Academy

Steve then detailed an upcoming B-24 Memorial to be presented to the renovated Service Club/Museum at Wendover.  The Memorial will include a highly detailed aluminum 1/20 scale model of the B-24 Liberator and some plaques with the history of the 467th Bomb Group and organizations that donated to the project.  Among the donors listed on one of the plaques is the Daedalians 24th Flight which donated $265 to the Memorial fund.

In addition to Colonel Watson’s presentation, the members of the 24th Flight and guests were treated to a Holiday event that included two special Spanish Flamenco Dances (see 4th photo below) given by Professional Dancer (and Friend of the Flight) Connie Sullivan.

Also, special thanks to Judy Campos and Julie Pitt for providing fantastic Christmas table decorations and two very delicious dessert cakes.

L to R: Col. Mario Campos, Mrs. Darci Todd, and her father, Jerry Dixon.

Guest Speaker, Steve Watson (L) discusses the Civil Air Patrol with Flight Captain, Colonel Alan Fisher

L to R Clockwise around the table: Gerry Wingett and Josiane, Connie Sullivan, Julie, and Col. Bob Pitt, Col. Mario Campos, and to his left, his wife Judy, with backs to the camera.

    A Professional dancer, Connie Sullivan performs a short Flamenco Dance routine for the assembled Daedalians.

Flight Capt. Col Alan Fisher introduces the Guest Speaker for the luncheon, Steve Watson (below) while Gerry Wingett, seated to the right, listens.

                                             Steve Watson, the guest presenter, opens his slide show . . .

At the close of the Liberator History presentation, Col. Fisher (r) gives a token of appreciation to Steve Watson.

This Fully Restored WWII XP-82, the “Twin Mustang,” Flies

   Doc Edwards

Many thanks to aviation news scout and long-time FASF member (L), Doc Edwards, of Deming, NM, and his good friend and aviation enthusiast, Bill Graybill, we bring you this fascinating and great restoration post about a flying WWII Twin Mustang (P-51), which bore the model number of the XP-82.  The video is only 3:33 minutes long.  The appearance was at the EAA’s AirVenture 2019. We’re also throwing in a few more videos of the XP-82 event and of the ship itself for your enjoyment, as well.



Watch a Highly Modified 70 Year Old Cessna’s Amazing Feats

1953 Cessna 170B Model

As a relatively new airplane at the time, it proved to be a comfortable and economical aircraft for our family.  With a four-place cabin and a six-cylinder Continental O-300 engine, it easily cruised at steady speeds of over 125 MPH.  We lived in Phoenix, Arizona, and often flew out to Los Angeles, CA for weekends or business.

The trip was usually about 3 easy flight hours from start to finish and the fuel costs were equivalent to those one had to pay to drive an ordinary four-door sedan on the identical trip. But it took a full day’s 8 or more hours to make the same journey by car.

Airline trips to Los Angeles took MORE time, because of the wait at the airports before departure, and the wait after arrival. Furthermore, in the Cessna 170B, we could fly directly to any town’s smaller airport near LA where we had our business or other activities.  On the other hand, the airlines only flew into the larger commercial airports such as either LAX or the Burbank airport, and those airports were rarely close to where we needed to go.

In any event, this story and video surprised me insofar as they showed an entirely different sort of utility for which the same model aircraft might be used.  And yet the airplane is now some 70 years old!

Here we go:  Let’s watch “The Most Highly Modified Cessna in the World!”  It’s just over 16 minutes long. I know this particular airplane from stem to stern, but had no idea, when modified this way, it was capable of almost flying at only 20 MPH airspeed – – – without stalling!  Seeing is believing.  Watch this remarkable 70-year-old Cessna 170B do the impossible.

If you would like to learn how to get this level of unusual performance out of your own Cessna 170, then you can take advanced BUSH training from the school: BUSH AIR is located at the Kidwell Airport (1L4) Cal Nev Ari, Nevada, USA. Their phone number is: (928) 460-3987.  The video is thanks to the pilot, Larry, who posted it and who runs this interesting site: Back Country 182 in Washington state. Tel: 206-453-9116

 

 

 

The Columbus Historical Society Elects New Officers for 2023

By far the oldest Columbus historical organization, the Columbus Historical Society (CHS), was formed in 1972, which makes it 50 years old, whereas our First Aero Squadron Foundation (FASF) wasn’t organized until 2007.

While the two sister groups both focus on the historical impact of the March 9, 1916 raid by Pancho Via on the once thriving border city of Columbus, only the CHS actually has a popular operational Museum facility, affectionately called the “Depot Museum.”

Why the “Depot?” Simply because it is housed in the old Columbus Railroad Station building.  Additionally, the principal focus of the FASF is primarily on the aviation aspect of the 1916 event, whereas the CHS addresses the entire raid episode and its following “Punitive Expedition” aftermath – – – and all other aspects of the history of Columbus.

On this special occasion of the Historical Society’s 50th Anniversary year, the Village of Columbus designed a hand-crafted Commemorative Plaque to honor one of its two still living founders, Anne Marie Beck, who along with her late husband, Ed Beck, Jr., actually organized the CHS and then acquired and subsequently fully restored the run-down old city train depot into the charming facility it is today.  Outgoing President Stan Stevens did a recent makeover of the entire sales floor area, so the Museum is quite an attractive asset 106 years after the infamous Raid on Columbus.

You might recognize Ms. Beck’s name because she is also a long-time member of the FASF Board of Advisors.

Today the Depot Museum is one of the Village’s most popular tourist attractions.  If you are ever fortunate enough to pass through or visit Columbus, don’t miss the opportunity to explore the Depot.  The large quantity and quality of its exhibits will more than make your visit worth the time.  It is regularly manned by well-trained Docent volunteers, and also has an interesting array of Raid-era memorabilia and other related artifacts for sale – – – tax-free.

Every year, the CHS officially conducts a solemn ceremony in memory of the 16 American deaths caused by Pancho Villa’s invading marauders.  This coming year the event will take place on Thursday, March 9, 2023, at 10:00 AM at the CHS Rotunda just South of its Depot Museum.

While at the Depot Museum you might want to join the organization since membership is very reasonable: $5 for individuals, and just $8 for a family.

To see any of the below photos full-size and in high resolution, simply click on them.

L to R: Dr. Kathleen Martin, Trustee and newly elected Historian, and Liz Pendleton, member

L to R: Ann Marie Beck, CHS Founder, and member, with Rita Kittrell, a visitor from Arizona

L to R: Gordon Taylor, CHS member, Mart Schneider, VP, and Velvet Fackeldey, re-elected Trustee

L to R: Rita Kittrell, Shirley Garber, Treasurer, and newly elected President, Stan Stevens (turned away) Velvet Fackeldey, Kathleen Martin, Gordon Taylor, Mart Schneider, Corby Burns, member, and Liz Pendleton

On left, Steven Zobeck, and Maria Constantine, Head Columbus Librarian. Both are CHS members.

L to R: Corby Burns, Leonard Steward, newly elected Treasurer, and Sarah Powell, member

President Stan Stevens explains the election procedure to the attendees.

L to R: Dr. Martin with Chuck Forgrave, a member

Liz Pendleton, Dr. Martin, Chuck Forgrave, Stan Stevens, Mart Schneider, Velvet Fackeldey, and Shirley Garber

L to R: Stan Stevens, Annette Schuster, Velvet Fackeldey, Shirley Garber, July McClure (standing), member, Chuck Forgrave, Dr. Martin, and Maria Constantine

On Right, Jim Tyo awards the Columbus Historical Society Plaque to Stan Stevens in recognition of his leadership as CHS President

Close-up of the Special Columbus Historical Society’s Special Award to Mr. Stevens in appreciation for his service

L to R: Stan Stevens, President, Jim Tyo, newly elected VP and Ann Beck with Shirley Garber, newly elected President

Close-up view of the Columbus Village custom Plaque awarded to Ann Marie Beck as a key founder of the CHS.