Category Archives: AVIATION NEWS

Aviation News of Interest

What Happened to the Dynacam (Revolver-Cam) Engine?

A Dyna Cam or Revolver Cam engine fitted for aircraft use.

The General Aviation (GENAV) industry and its consumers have been facing a serious dilemma for a number of years now.  As you know, leaded fuel has been banned across the board for ground based vehicles here in the United States for a number of years, but general aviation aircraft are still using high-octane leaded-fuel in most of its fleet.  The EPA has been battling to have leaded aviation gasoline similarly banned, but there has remained a serious problem:  The majority of existing GENAV engines cannot safely operate on un-leaded gasoline.  Competitions have been underway for many years to see if one or more of the major Gasoline Refining Corporations can develop an unleaded gasoline blend that is safe for use in airplanes, but to this date, nothing is yet widely available for purchase.

Leaded gasoline for ground vehicles has already been banned for 24 years (in 1994!), but, while the FAA had targeted unleaded aviation gas’ (AVGAS) introduction to GENAV by 2018, nothing has yet actually happened to make this a reality, even though the FAA’s Fuels Program Office had been tasked to fulfill this objective.  This means that today almost 170,000 GENAV aircraft are still gassing up with fuel containing that otherwise banned nasty Tetraethyl lead.

Although many GENAV airplanes can safely use straight Motor Gas (MOGAS), providing it has no Ethanol in its blend, and many airplanes have been FAA Certificated to legally use it, the supply of MOGAS without any Ethanol is becoming progressively harder to find, and most refiners have simply phased out making their blends without the alcohol.  Additionally, because of EPA requirements and policies, even if the MOGAS is a non-Ethanol blend, it is not required to label it as such, making it a potentially dangerous purchase for an airplane user.

MOGAS with Ethanol is actually hazardous to aircraft engines, and, in fact, it is also damaging to many older automobiles and trucks, which were not designed to safely use gasoline containing Ethanol.  Because the Ethanol absorbs moisture, it tends to seriously corrode old styled rubber fuel lines and other components in older vehicles.

The Dynacam Engine is very different from conventional reciprocating type airplane engines, and is enough different that it has no trouble using MOGAS.  However, that is only one of the superior features of this radical engine design.  There are a number of additional advantages over regular AVGAS powered aircraft engines.  The photo above shows what this new engine design looks like.

Here, below, are some other views of the engine with its significantly different configuration:

Dyna or Revolver Cam Engine showing its lack of externally exposed cylinders.  It take a form more like a jet engine.

Here, above, is a cut-a-way view of one of the Dyna Cam engines such as those intended for GENAV aircraft.

Here is an illustration of the unique piston movement seen inside a Dyna Cam engine.

Here is a general introduction to this unique new engine, one that has been patented, but not yet introduced to the GENAV market in a serious way:

The original engine is patented and the Company (Axial Vector Energy) has now made patent applications and received patent pending status for additional features that have been refined. Activity and contacts from the website indicate that there are a lot of buyers for this new engine technology.  The first production engine has been assembled and has completed its initial testing. The Company has had to design and build a custom dynamometer on which to complete engine testing. After testing has been completed on the first engine, it was installed in a Cessna 182 light aircraft.  It has also been installed in a Piper Cherokee in order to be able to demonstrate the engine’s superior performance capability.

Additional installations are being discussed with owners of several experimental homebuilt aircraft here in the U.S., including, a LancAir, an RV6, a custom designed pusher fashioned after the Long Easy canard plane (a newly designed homebuilt called the Atlantica), and several others, including a SeaBee, a Seawind homebuilt, and it will also possibly end up in a Cessna 185.

The initial Dyna-Cam Engine to be manufactured and sold is rated at 200 HP. That would make it equivalent in HP to the Lycoming O, or IO 360 opposed-cylinder air-cooled engine already in widespread use throughout the GENAV industry (See below photo).  But this Dyna-Cam engine is only 13″ in diameter, 40″ long, and weighs but 300 pounds with basic accessories. It has unique features and major benefits over conventional engines of similar weight and power. The benefits include:

  • 50% smaller size,
  • 50% fewer replacement parts,
  • Lower manufacturing costs in equal production,
  • Better fuel economy,
  • Smoother operation – it can idle as slowly as only 150 RPM!,
  • Lighter weight per torque HP output compared to conventional air-cooled engines,
  • Plus nearly 100% higher torque enabling the engine to turn high-efficiency propellers with lower noise output at lower RPMs,
  • Liquid, rather than air-cooled

Below is one of most popular GENAV four-cylinder air-cooled engines with about the same power as the above Dyna Cam Engine.  The following video explaining the new Dyna-Cam engine is about 12:00 minutes long.  Remember to turn your speakers on to hear the audio.

 

Lycoming IO-360 Four cylinder 180 HP Air-Cooled Aircraft Engine

Below is another short clip of this same type of new engine, which shows it in action in a cut-a-way video format, but here it is called the Axial Vector Engine – the video is less than 1:00 long:

A Short Video Up Date On The Chinese Navy’s War Readiness

   Virg Hemphill

Thanks once again to our very alert Aviation News Scout, Virg Hemphill (at left), we bring you this insightful recruiting video of how the Chinese Navy stands battle-ready at the present time.

This is not a comparative video, but primarily a view of what the Chinese are up to at the moment.  Unfortunately, this degree of readiness for war requires that the U.S. react in kind, in order to maintain a balance of arms and general military preparedness.

The exceptional degree of high-caliber Chinese precision, coupled with their extreme level of teamwork and surprisingly high degree synchronous formations within their military ranks, as seen in this video, should certainly keep us alert in respect to their capacity, if not readiness, for effective warfare.

While part of what helped the U.S. prevail against both the Japanese and Germans during WWII was our superior equipment, it was also our exceptionally smooth teamwork, particularly among our pilots in their capacity fo fly as efficient fighting teams – – – in highly coordinated formation flights – – –  that led to our overwhelming success.

Clearly, the Chinese have not only learned from our skilled and superior military, naval, and aviation technology – and techniques – but they may have even surpassed us in regard to such military dynamics as in their smooth unified team movements, as is witnessed in their below formations – – and in their impressively sharp mass drill skills.

Also, one cannot help but notice the astounding similarity their aircraft, surface and underwater vessels have to some of our own war weaponry.  Have the Chinese actually, literally,  copied some of our military equipment designs?

EAA and FASF’s Bob Dockendorf Inducted into Hall of Fame

   Long time FASF and EAA Member, Bob Dockendorf poses proudly with his new Hall of Fame medal about his neck.

The FASF’s long-standing member from El Paso, Bob Dockendorf,  has just been elected by the Board of Directors of the El Paso Aviation Association and the local Aviation Community to be inducted into the El Paso Aviation Hall of Fame.  This past weekend celebrated this significant event with a special banquet, packed with area aviation celebrities and held at the Dona Ana Country International Jetport‘s famed War Eagles Air Museum (“WEAM”).

Most know Bob as the Executive Director of WEAM, but there is more you may not know:

Not just for his accomplishments as Director of WEAM, where, as its Executive Director, he has taken the historical facility to a new level of admirable excellence, but he was a key founder among the few local area aviators who started the highly successful new EAA chapter 1570 at the Dona Ana County International Jetport.

He also directed the start of the John and Betty MacGuire student Pilot scholarship as part of that same EAA 1570 project. This student contribution provides both an aircraft and flight instruction for young adults up to and including their first solo flight.

Those are but just a few of his aviation contributions to our local communities.  Besides his personal membership in the FASF, Bob’s beloved WEAM is one of our proud Local Business Supporters, too.

Here is a quote from the official Aviation Hall of Fame Award plaque created in Bob’s Honor:

Even in his childhood days, Robert J. (Bob) Dockendorf had a passion for history,
aviation and museums.  Born and educated in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, several job
promotions and opportunities eventually brought him, his wife Mary and their
family to El Paso, Texas.

He served proudly as the Squadron Leader of the Sun Country Squadron of the
Commemorative Air Force as well as an Officer of Chapter 1570 of the Experimental
Aircraft Association.

While completing his career as a property and casualty insurance broker, he served
in a professional advisory capacity to the newly formed War Eagles Air Museum.  When
he retired from his successful insurance career, he was offered the opportunity and
challenge to serve as the War Eagles Air Museum’s Executive Director.

Being armed with aircraft, automobiles, memorabilia, and a deep desire to succeed, he
led the staff and volunteers at War Eagles to the accomplishment of the mission of the
museum, “To Educate and Encourage,” paying specific attention to youth.  All those efforts
helped bring new life and energy to the Dona Ana County International Jetport at Santa
Teresa, New Mexico, adjacent to El Paso, Texas.

The following photographs were taken this past weekend at the ceremony and Banquet held in Bob’s honor, where Bob was inducted into the El Paso Texas Aviation Hall of Fame.

L to R: John Keithly, President of the EAA Chapter 1570 chats with Virg Hemphill, FASF Aviation News Scout and Volunteer Docent at WEAM.  To Virg’s right in background, is FASF member and also Docent, Charlie Overstreet.

L to R: Docent Charlie Overstreet talking with Mario Campos, also a Docent at WEAM. Both are members of the FASF.

L to R: Ammber Valverde, Daedalian Aviation Scholarship winner, engaged in a lively discussion with her table mate, former El Paso, TX Mayor and renown local Aviator, Suzie Azar, who is also one of the FASF’s Advisors Ammber is a Junior at the University of Texas El Paso (UTEP) and also a member of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) AFROTC.  She plans to be an Air Force Pilot.

L to R: at the Daedalian Society Table is: Virg and Jenine Hemphill, Roger Nichols, Mayre Sue and Charlie Overstreet, and Mario and Judy Campos.  All are active FASF members.

The El Paso CAP Table with two prior Hall of Fame awardees, Roland and Debbie Torres, along with their Cadet Honor Guard: From (R to L), Cadet Captain Hunter Spier in Dress Blue uniform, and C/CMSgt Jonathan Herl, C/Amn Eryal Martinez, C/MSgt Daniel Erives, , and  C/A1C Vida Rote. This is the group of CAP Cadets who conducted the Flag Ceremonies at the opening and closing of the event.

L to R: Virg Hemphill, Honored Hall of Famer, Bob Dockendorf, Roger Nichols, and Jenine Hemphill.

                           Bob Dockendorf after accepting the Hall of Fame Award, speaking to the guests.

View of the tables and attendees at the Banquet.

Guest speaker and aviation enthusiast, “Doppler” Dave Spielman, long time Chief Meteorologist for the ABC Network TV Channel in El Paso, TX, KVIA.

   Ammber Valverde with Daedalian Flight Captain, Roger Nichols.  Roger’s flight is helping mentor Ms. Valverde

 Amber poses with Mr. Dockendorf along with Laura Ditlevson, former winner of the EAA MacGuire Student Pilot Scholarship.

 

Ammber intently listens to former FASF Trustee and present FASF Advisor and Chair of the Dona Ana County International Jetport’s Board of Directors, Col. John Orton.  An ex USAF JAG officer, John continues to fly his own Experimental Aircraft.

Watch the One-And-Only Svetlana Showing Off Over Russia

Svetlana Kapanina

      Svetlana exits her plane after a show.

Kapanina was born on December 28, 1968 in Shchuchinsk,  Kazakhstan.   And, now at 50, she remains active in the European and American Air Show circuit.

She dedicated herself to a number of different sports at school and always enjoyed motorcycles – and  other motor vehicles, as well. She enrolled at medical school in Tselinograd, where she graduated in medical support sciences. She started flying at 19, in 1988, in a Sukhoi Su-26M3,  (see below right) while working as a technician at the Kurgan Sports Aviation Club.

The Sukhoi S-26M in which Svetlana learned aerobatics.

By 1991 she was already an instructor pilot at DOSAAF‘s (Volunteer Society for Cooperation with the Army, Aviation, and Navy) Irkutsk Club, and then went back to Kurgan. In 1991, she became a member of the Russian national aerobatic team. In 1995 she graduated from Kaluga Aeronautical  Technical School.

She is now lives in Moscow with her husband and two children.

in aerobatics Kapanina was World Aerobatic Champion in the women’s category in 1996, 1998, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2011 and has won the title more times than any other pilot in that (women’s) category.  In addition, she was overall World Air Games Champion in 1997 and 2001.

Russian President, Vladimir Putin, poses with Svetalna after awarding her National Order of Courage

Together with Mikhail Mamistov and Oleg Spolyansky, she won the team gold medal in the 16th FAI European Aerobatic Championships in 2008 in Hradec Králové (Czech Republic). She placed fourth overall and was best female participant.

In 1997, she received the Paul Tissandier Diploma by the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI).  In 2005 she was awarded the Sabiha Gökçen Medal[2] and the Centenary Medal by the FAI. She was awarded Russia’s Order of Courage by President Vladimir Putin on December 22, 2014 (see photo immediately above to the left), just 6 days before her 46th birthday.

Watch Svetlana run through one of her Airshow routines over her home country, after greeting the crowd over the loudspeakers.  This video is about 17 minutes long.  Turn your sound up and go to full screen to fully appreciate the excellent high-resolution videography.

And also, below, watch her airplane cavorting through the sky with her hallmark precision in one of her World Aerobatic Competitions.  You will witness Svetlana performing some extremely difficult manuevers with astounding accuracy. It’s a short clip, only 3:57 in length.  Like an accomplished Prima Donna ballerina, this woman aviator may make these manuevers look easy, but they are, as you might expect, extraordinarily difficult – often involving Svetlana pulling fairly severe positive and negative “G’s” (Gravity Forces).

CAP Squadron Commander, Natalie Franc, Briefs Daedalians

Major Natalie Franc, a native of Glenhrothes, Scotland, is the current commanding officer of the El Paso, TX Civil Air Patrol (CAP) “Composite” Squadron. As distinguished from a regular squadron, a Composite Squadron includes a CAP Cadet Corps, along with its Senior Members.

Natalie began her career with the CAP when living in Hawaii after having been in the Royal Air Force (RAF), in which she enlisted when 18 years old, after having first served, since she was 13, in the Air Training Corps of Great Britain.  In the RAF she was assigned to Intelligence, where she used her skills as a linguist with a fluency in the Russian Language.

When on active duty with the RAF she met and married her husband, Michael, who was also in the Intelligence branch of the U. S. Army.  When he was transferred back to the U.S. in 2002, she moved there with him.  Before finally settling in El Paso, Texas, Natalie had lived in Maryland, Hawaii, Arizona, and Germany.  As a civilian, in addition to her work with the CAP, she has worked in various capacities in Emergency Services and has been a volunteer with Army Family Programs and has also been an Armed Forces Caseworker.  Natalie now runs her own business in El Paso.

The Major showed a custom prepared Power Point slide show to the Daedalian Flight members, who are also members of the FASF.  The following photographs of this event are all in high-resolution, and can be seen full-size by simply clicking on them as they appear below.

L to R: Major Natalie Franc, Colonels Mario Campos and Bob Pitt.

L to R: FASF Aviation News Scout, Virgil Hemphill, Colonels Norman Rice (back to camera) and Alan Fisher. Colonel Fisher is also an active volunteer pilot for the Las Cruces, NM Squadron of the CAP.

L to R: Mark Pfluger, Active Duty Army Rotary Wing Pilot from Ft. Bliss’ Biggs Army Airfield, and his mentor, Flight Captain, Roger Nichols.

L to R: Maj. Franc, Col. Campos and his wife, Judy, Julie and Col. Bob Pitt, Retired USAF Colonels, Melissa and Alan Fisher, Virg Hemphill and Roger Springstead (USNR Ret.) Anselmo Rocha, Assistant to Col. Norman and Mrs. Ulla Rice, Jerry Dixon (USMC), Dave Ginn, Charlie Overstreet,  Jim Brandon, Col. Pete Brandon’s visiting brother, and just out of camera range to Pete’s left is his guest Skip Orrell.

Major Franc adjusts computer projector . . . as she explains that the CAP has the largest single-engined fleet of Cessna Aircraft in the world.  The powered aircraft total is about 560, and she reported that the CAP also owns 47 glider-sailplanes, which are used to train Cadet members, along with several Hot Air Balloons, which select Cadets are also taught to operate and fly.

The Major explains the National CAP organization’s composition . . . which inlcudes the Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

In this set of slides, Major Franc gives some examples of the CAP role in Search and Rescue Operatrions (“SAR” Ops).

L to R: Melissa and Alan Fisher and Virg Hemphill listen to Maj. Franc explaining her El Paso TX CAP operation . . .

Here the CAP Commander explains the role of the CAP in disaster Relief Operations, noting her own squadron’s heavy involvement in Hurricane Harvey, which struck East Texas, in particular, the Houston area.

In this slide the Major explains that the CAP mission also includes other roles in addition to Search and Rescue and Disater Relief . . . pointing out that her squadron plays an important role in Border and National Air Space Security.

Here Natalie describes the numerouis mission qualifications in which CAP members work throughout the Squadrons.

And here she shows the Daedalians and their guests how the CAP stays in constant radio contact with its mission personnel and aircraft during operations . . .

Major Franc sums up her presentation and takes questions from the audience . . .

L to R: Major Franc and Flight Captain Roger Nichols study one of the slides shown during the presentation.

L to R: Col. Bob Pitt, Major Natalie Franc, Flight Captain Roger Nichols, and Colonel Campos, who invited the Major to make the presentation . . .

L to R: Flght Captain Nichols and newly inducted Daedalian, Dave Ginn, and Colonel Bob Pitt.

Another Special Saturday Stunned Crowds at Oshkosh 2018

Every air show performance during EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018 was exciting, but Saturday found a way to take the cake yet again this year. Relive the excitement of aerobatic performers, big tankers, our latest jet fighters, and everything in between with this video recap of the action.  Remember not only to turn your sound on, but to also click the 2:41 long video clip to enjoy its high-resolution  quality in full screen!

Irene’s Awesome Russian Yak-52 Trainer Flight over Australia

Hunter Valley NSW Australia

Pilot Jamie Riddell

Make sure your sound is on, but know that there will nevertheless be little if any sound at the outset, but when Jamie connects the intercom, then you’ll hear them talking just fine, as they converse throughout the flight adventure.

When young Irene and the pilot speak to one another, you won’t want to miss the chatter.  It’s priceless, and the video gives an awesome insight into a young girl’s first great airborne adventure above Australia.  While you will hear the pilot and his passenger’s chatter, you will not hear any loud engine nor wind noise, since the hook up prevented those other sounds from being a significant part of the finished video.

You will watch as this young lady has an experience she’s not likely to forget, and it’s written all over her face as she is cavorted above the airfield at which the Yak is based.  Notice, on take off, what a good rate of climb this trainer possesses.

The Yak is a post WWII 1970s vintage aircraft, designed, built and used in the USSR after the war and now available surplus almost anywhere in the world.  Much like the earlier American equivalent, the North American T6 “Texan,” except that it has a tricycle landing gear.  Of course the tricycle arrangement makes it much easier to land than its American “Texan” counterpart.  The video is 13:44 minutes long.


And, here below, is a short (3″21 minutes long) video of one of these Russian Yak 52 Trainers.  Watch as it shows off its excellent rate of climb speed, and also as it performs some extreme aerobatics after take off.