Category Archives: NEW VIDEOS

Recent Videos

FASF’s Home Town Celebrated Founding Day Over Weekend

    Mayor Bruce Salas

After several less than exciting false starts, Mayor Salas‘ idea of starting a new day on which Columbus will celebrate it beginnings – now called Founding Day – was a great success two weekends ago.  If you’d like to guess when that historic date was, just go to the end of the post/story.

Other old time FASF members in addition to Mayor Salas also played an active role in helping the event go over the top.  July McClure, our Recording Secretary and Aerodrome Editor busily entertained the crowds at the East end of town in front of her Tumbleweed Theater. Another long-time member and major donor, our FASF landlord, Norma Gomez, also answered many questions thrown her way by a number of festival attendees as well as participants and caballeros.  Your  Webmaster took the Mayor aside for a five minute interview about the event, which appears below.  Click in the lower right of the screen to view the video full-size.

All in all, the festive celebration was a genuine step back in time to the late 19th Century, when the streets of Columbus were as actively used by horses as by its citizens.  Here are some photos taken of the occasion.  If you’d like to see them full size and in high resolution, simply click on them:

                        FASF Office the Chamber of Commerce (White Building) & Tumbleweed Theater (yellow)

                                                              Looking West along Broadway Avenue

    This was back then, above – and below is today: 1916-Ravel Bros. Mercantile Store Downtown Columbus

                                                              City Hall and Sheriff’s Office complex

                                                         A look down Broadway to the West in 1916

                                             Broadway blocked off for the Horse Parade- Looking to the West

            To East: The Railroad Depot and the railroad to El Paso in 1916 – Today’s Depot is the Historical                        Society’s Museum.  Today that railroad is the bed for NM State Route 9 to El Paso, Texas!

                                                                            Columbus Court House

                                          Former Mayor Philip Skinner’s Los Milagros Hotel

                 Celebrants and horsemen chatting outside the Restored Senior Center Facility

                                     View inside the Senior Center where Free lunch was provided for all . . .

                                                            Sheriff’s Team Joined the party in the Park

                                                Visitors enjoying lunch outside the Borderland Cafe

After the parade there were still many horses to be loaded for their trip home . . .unless they were among those who rode to Columbus.                                                              COLUMBUS WAS FOUNDED ON JUNE 18, 1891!

FLYING KLM FROM AMSTERDAM TO PARIS – – – IN 1929 +

How about going back in time to fly with Royal Dutch Airlines (KLM) with a Fokker F.VII aircraft from Amsterdam to Paris in 1929? And, in COLOR no less!  Take note of the fact that there was no paved runway for operations.  Large close cropped grass air fields were first used for Airline and general aircraft operations throughout not just Europe, but elsewhere as well.

Back then the flying public had no long check-in times, no conveyor belts, no gates, no luggage claim areas, no queues, no removal of belts and shoes, no jumbo’s, but in stead just a simple step ladder to board the plane with your suitcase in your hand to join the other half-a-dozen passengers.

Aircraft in that era were noisy, cold, provided often highly uncomfortably bumpy rides and could only fly at low altitude because of the lack of a pressurized cabin.  Seats were made of wicker and the only entertainment was the steward or stewardess trying to serve coffee while attempting to keep their balance.

The original B&W film has been motion-stabilized, speed-corrected, A.I. enhanced and A.I. colorized.

To see the films and videos right here, simply click on the cover photos of each of them, then sit back, relax, and enjoy learning more of aviation’s great and colorful history.

B&W footage from Holland by: Beeld En Geluid. Originally posted by ‘Rick88888888’

And, let’s take another look through the Dutch film photographers’ lens at air travel via KLM in pre-WWII Europe, in the 1930s.  This is the original B&W film version with its, then, primitive sound track.  The following video of this film is entitled KLM & Schiphol Airport in the 30’s.  (It is 24 minutes long, in Dutch, yet nevertheless easy to follow and understand).

Much of the film is clearly taken just prior to the outbreak of WWII on the Continent in the late 1930’s because so many Douglass DC-3 airliners are seen in the Dutch Hangars and on the ramps.  Your webmaster has many memorable hours flying this amazingly futuristic airship (the DC-3) and its big sister, the DC-4.

It is no wonder that many of them are are still airborne some 86 years after their introduction in 1935.  Notice that, in this pre-war era,  English was not yet the universal language of Aviation. The dominance of English came about after the end of WWII, when it became the official language across the globe of all aviation air traffic control communications.

The film will show some proudly emblazoned swastikas adorning the German airliners parked at the airfield.  There are glimpses of London, Berlin and Paris in the film, which also features a dramatic DC-3 Flight to Schiphol Airport during some inclement weather and the clear relief among the Airport personnel when the ship appears out of the cloudy skies and settles safely to the airfield.  They had good reason to be concerned, since commercial aviation of that era was anything but safe in terms of what that means today.

Member, John “Cabi” Cabigas, Pilots James May Into Space

“Cabi” Cabigas, USAF

Long-time FASF member, John “Cabi” Cabigas, (at Left) flew the famous BBC Commentator, James May, into Space in the First Aero’s Dragon Lady, and did it at the First Aero Squadron’s current location at Beale Air Force Base (BAFB) North of Sacramento, CA. Of course Cabi conducted that great space adventure while still on active duty with the USAF as one of the famed Lockheed U-2 Dragon Lady Instructor Pilots.  Here is a short 30 minute summary of that memorable flight’s full documentary, which had, as its central figure, TV Journalist, James May,   Most of the full-length documentary was made by the BBC, but some was shot by the USAF.

Here, below, is another flight aboard the Dragon Lady, but without either Cabi or James May.  It is only :10 minutes long, but the resolution of the video is higher.  But if you’d like to see both Cabi and James May, you’ll only see them in the first video above.  In the meantime, Cabi advises that Amazon Prime has the full documentary in high resolution, should you be able to view that version:

If you click right here, you will get chance to witness Cabi again, as your webmaster interviews him, along with his fellow Dragon Lady Instructor Pilot, Bill Williams.  Both gentlemen were video-taped at the 100th Anniversary of the First Aero Squadron’s birth, held at Beale AFB, CA. 

Cabi lives nearby the Air Force base and keeps himself busy flying his own classic 1940 J3 Cub, which has a mighty 65HP engine to help it race aloft.  Your reporter soloed in one of them – sans brakes and tail wheel – back in 1944.  Since retiring from active duty in 2010, Cabi has remained an active member of his local chapter of the EAA and belongs to other aviation groups, as well.

When he graduated from San Jose State University in the AFROTC, he had also gained his FAA Certification as an A&P mechanic!  That in and of itself was quite an unusual accomplishment.

Major Cabigas’ USAF Pilot career spanned just shy of a quarter century, and involved 18 years of working with the Dragon Lady.   He holds a FAA Certified Flight instructor (CFI) Rating along with both a Commercial and Airline Transport Pilot License.  His activities with the EAA are largely motivated by his interest in sharing his love of aviation with the many Young Eagles who are lucky enough to get an airplane ride with this accomplished Air force Pilot, an American military aviator who was actually born in the Philippines!

The Tribute to WWII Triple Ace: Bud Anderson – and the P-51

Doc Edwards

    Doc Edwards

Thanks to our loyal Aviation News Scout, Doc Edwards (L) of Deming, NM, we have the following collection of videos memorializing not just Bud Anderson and what he accomplished in his now classic WWII fighter, but how his and the plane’s unique legacy continues on – – – long after he and his fellow Air Corps/Force pilots finished their life-and-death task of finally winning over the embattled skies over Europe in 1945.

Then Capt. Bud Anderson under his P-51 “Old Glory” Prop Blades during WWII – 1943

This first short video (7:06) summarizes the EAA’s Tribute to Colonel Anderson:

And there’s more (19:54) here:

Click here to go directly to Bud Anderson’s Homepage on his website.

MAKS-2021 (Russia’s) International Aviation and Space Salon

The MAKS International Aviation and Space Salon is the official title of Russia’s annual International Air Show . . . just per chance the name, “Salon” threw you off the headline’s meaning.

Russia’s President, Vladimir Putin, lauded his nation’s new entry into the Air Power world of their new SU 35 5th Generation Fighter.  It was manufactured by the country’s renown aircraft maker, Sukhoi The annual event opened Tuesday (July 20, 2021) in Zhukovsky, outside of Moscow.

Several Russian aircraft manufacturers unveiled other prototypes and currently operational aircraft, including new fighter jets, one that features stealth capabilities and other advanced characteristics, which, like the U.S. F-35, will be offered to foreign buyers.

The event also included competitions and air demonstrations by other visiting countries as well as by the host nation.

The following are some insights into the big Air Show events by way of several videos produced by Russian’s International Television platform, RTRT’s sister News agency, available via the Internet, also with International distribution, is known as RUPTLY or Daily Motion (streaming TV).

Stay posted for our usual coverage of the world’s largest Airshow event, held each year in Oshkosh, WI, AirVenture 2021, which is occurring simultaneously with this Russian MAKS “Salon” 2021.  AirVenture is usually personally covered by a number of FASF members, who are also active members of the event’s host, the EAA.

The below MAKS video is only 2:06 long and is summary of Rotary and Fixed Wing as well as Fighters doing their aerobatic maneuvers on air show day 2.

And, here below, are some clips of the opening day’s Air Show, 23:16 long, including various airborne ships strutting their capabilities:

And for those of you who love Rotary Wing Aircraft, here is a 8:22 long Russian Helicopter manufacturer, Rosoboronexport’s, pitch for these novel ships, including the latest offshore Mi-171A3; multipurpose (including fire-fighting) Ka-32A11M; and Ansat-M, passenger Ka-62 and the military combat ship, the Ka-52K:

THE 1949 FARNBOROUGH AIR SHOW IN UNITED KINGDOM

For Aviation History Buffs, and for those of us blessed enough to have lived at the time, here is a short (10:10) video of that world-class UK Air Show, one at which our Advisor, Peter Westacott, (2nd from Bottom on Advisors’ Page) often officiated.

Famous WWII Fighter/Bomber Made From Forest Materials

Most of you have already guessed:

Yes, we’re talking about that blazingly fast Mosquito Bomber-turned-Fighter, first built by de Havilland in 1940, yet designed two years earlier – – – even before GB entered the war in Europe.  And, long before the more recent Green Revolution, the amazing airplane was actually made primarily of wood – – – both plywood and balsa wood.

Like the famed U.S. P-51 Mustang and Supermarine Spitfire, it rapidly became one of those more iconic aircraft seen weaving through the skies over Europe in defense of the Allies and their forces.  For many years, it was the fastest operational ship, hitting well over 400 MPH with its twin Rolls Royce Merlin engines making their distinctive humming sound.  Here is a video of that great fighting machine courtesy of Kermit Weeks (Fantasy of Flight Museum).  (It is only 12:21 long.)

Click right here and read much more about the indomitable flying machine.

And, click here to see it compared to its American “twin”, the Lockheed P-38.

FINALLY: Are These Our New 6th Generation Fighter Jets?

As those of us who try to stay abreast of the latest military aviation news well know, there is constant rumoring about what might be afoot in international Research and Development programs towards being the first nation to foist a 6th Generation Jet Fighter on the world stage.

Here, below, is a quick 10:38 minute long video clip of what w might expect on the American scene:

And, here’s another peek at what’s going on behind that “TOP SECRET” obscurity barrier.  This “Military Notes” video tell its “computer generated voice-over” story in only 6:15 minutes, with an extra add-on of some 1:50 seconds unnarrated current USAF flight line video coverage.

 

3/16/16, then 74 yrs later, 3/6/90, the FAS made New History

Of course, most of you know what took place to make world history on March 16, 1916, but the successor to that early Curtiss JN-3, Jenny, also a special SR (Surveillance-Reconnaissance) aircraft, the Lockheed RS-71 Blackbird, also made its mark on aviation history.

NASA Model of SR-71 Touches down with Drogue Chute

While the Jenny flew into history by engaging in the first sustained U.S. combat operations using airplanes in March 1916, 74 years later, or 31 years ago today, the First Aero Squadron’s SR-71 Blackbird also flew into the history books. Here, below (only 00:24 sec. long), is the Blackbird flying very slowly with its landing gear extended for landing:

It was on March 6, 1990, that the SR-71 made the fastest flight by an airplane from Los Angeles, CA to Washington DC – in record-breaking time . . . and that record still stands unbroken to this date.

It made that flight in only 64 minutes!

Pilots Ed Yielding and Joseph Vida flew that transcontinental flight from Los Angeles, California, to Washington, DC, in a blistering 64 minutes – – – with an average speed of 2,144.8 MPH.

Here are some interesting facts along with several videos of that initially retired in 1990 First Aero speed machine, which was later put back into the skies by Congress in 1995, but later, in 1997, when it was finally cut from the USAF inventory by President Bill Clinton, effective in 1998.

Below is a short video (1:15 long) explanation at the Smithsonian SR-71 Display, but the moderator, Peter Jakab, Chief Curator at the Smithsonian Air & Space Center, made two misstatements.  Can you detect either of them?

In 1976, the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird broke the world’s record for sustained altitude in horizontal flight at 25,929 meters (85,069 feet). The same day another SR-71 set an absolute speed record of 3,529.6 kilometers per hour (2,193.2 miles per hour), approximately Mach 3.3.  Both of these distinguished records still stand unchallenged.

And here’s Scott Willey, also at the Smithsonian, describing the coast-to-coast record (:45 sec.):

And, another video (1:13 long):

And now, some “sonic booms” behind several classic photos of the Blackbird in flight (:47 sec.):

To see who the (only 86) pilots were who actually flew the Blackbird operationally, here’s that listing.  Do any of you know which of the FASF Advisors was one of those select few pilots?

If you’d like to see more about this all-time record-breaking flying machine, just enter “SR-71 Blackbird” in our FASF website’s search field to your right, and you’ll find much more interesting information, photos, and videos of the successor to the FAS Curtiss JN-3 of 1916.  There are at least four other posts about this famous blackbird.

Here’s another short (5:21) video by a former Blackbird pilot, Colonel Rich Graham, on what goes into flying the speed machine.

 

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