Category Archives: NEW VIDEOS

Recent Videos

2nd Largest Air Force – – – In Arizona’s Famous Boneyard

When your Webmaster lived in Arizona for 20 years, first in Tucson, and later in Phoenix, I often saw and/or visited the world famous aircraft “boneyard” at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, but more often, its equally well known Non-Profit Pima Air and Space Museum at the Southern border of that large air base.  The museum has a wind-fall of retired war planes literally sitting in its own backyard.  The following official United States Air Force video (9:25 long) tells the interesting story of both the famous “boneyard” – – – and of its neighboring museum.

The U.S. Navy formerly maintained its own Boneyard, but up to the West of Phoenix, Arizona, at Litchfield Park.  However they closed that in the early 1960’s, and consolidated the Defense Department’s storage needs with the much larger – and drier – Tucson Davis-Monthan facility.

Hopefully, you might find this video story about the “Boneyard” interesting, and certainly informative.  The video is a fascinating insight into our own history.

For a separate yet spectacular 360 degree view of this huge airplane boneyard, visit our previous movingly (it is in motion!) graphic post of three years ago, right here.

[Although about four years old, you might still enjoy it at full-screen mode on your computer]

A NEW VISION – USMC RELEASES NEW RECRUITING VIDEO

       Ret. USMC Pilot Jerry Dixon

Thanks to our long-time Member, and Aviation Scout, Jerry Dixon (at left), we see the latest video released by the United States Marine Corps Recruiting Office.  It may show only a few short glimpses of their new F-35B variant (Vertical Take Off and Landing capability) Lightning II, but we think you might like its message and delivery.  The video speaks for itself, so not much need to add any more.

Thanks, Jerry!

Below is the short (4:04 minutes) USMC video entitled:

The New Marine Corps Vision.

The Fascinating History of Lockheed’s Famous “Skunk Works”

From an unexpected source comes this following video, a long one (53+ minutes) compared to most we post, but more than worth the entertainingly intelligent and richly educational perspective provided by the speaker, Mr. Nickolas Means . . . software engineer par excellence.

Nick has had a lifelong love affair with anything and everything aviation related, and has a special fascination for some of the worst airplane accidents and tragedies – which he studies just to learn what the humans directing the events leading up to those accidents did right – – – and did wrong.  His focus on these otherwise morbid events is a strategic one:  He sets out to explore and better understand the Cockpit Dynamics of the flight crews in these tragedies.

Mr. Means sets about colorfully describing the history of some of the First Aero’s most famous flying machines (The U-2 and SR-71), but with the prime focus on the creative team of geniuses at Lockheed who invented them.  The below video is much akin to the TED series of educational and enlightening lessons we’ve so often enjoyed.  In fact, aside from its longer duration, this presentation by Nickolas could easily be one given to the huge international following of the entire TED series.

Long before Agile and Lean became computer programming buzzwords, a scrappy group of aerospace engineers led by Kelly Johnson at Lockheed’s Skunk Works, were using similar practices to produce some of the most amazing aircraft ever built. The famous U-2Dragon Lady” spy plane, the SR-71 “Blackbird,” and the F-117A Stealth Fighter are among the incredible planes the engineers at Skunk Works produced under impossibly tight deadlines and exceptionally limited budgets – – – and let’s not forget to mention their latest brilliant fighting machines, the twin engined F-22 Raptor . . . (below at left)

F-22 Raptors in Flight.

and,  and most recently, the single engine F-35 Lightning II, pictured at right:

Formation of two F-35 Lightning II’s

What can we learn from the stories of these amazing planes and the engineers who built them?

Let’s go back to our roots and let the original Skunk Works experts teach us about building awesome stuff together.  Chief Skunk Works Engineer, Kelly Johnson, steadfastly held to certain governing principles in his management style, one of which was his belief that the best things can be accomplished by a “small group of good people.”  Consequently, his team was notably small, but lean and meanly intelligent – – – and their budgets were notoriously small and deadlines alarmingly short.  But their results were astoundingly brilliant – – – and successful.

While his counterparts elsewhere at Lockheed usually had large groups of employees and equally large budgets, this was rarely the case with Kelly’s Team.  Lockheed’s other projects, even those which produced the final designs out of their Skunk Works, had the latest in engineering technology deeply integrated into their operations, whereas Kelly’s team refused to use the latest CAD (Computer Aided Drawing) equipment, relying, instead, on good old-fashioned pencil and paper drafting techniques. The comparatively simpler use of paper and pencil better fulfilled the extreme need for flexibility that Kelly required of his team.

Kelly’s Skunk workers were always minimalists in how they created, and drawings of their designs were notably simple rather than complex, as were – and needed to be – the final drawings used for actual production of the Skunk Works designs.

Even Kelly’s successor as CEO at the Skunk Works, Ben Rich, continued the high-creativity “think-outside-the-box” spirit of his predecessor, which resulted in the same predictably brilliant results as those achieved by the team under its original chief.  The Skunk Works’ success makes it a model enterprise for the study of management styles and of the excellence that can be achieved when teamwork and worker independence are paramount management principles.

It was Kelly’s outstanding methods of management that eventually carried over into the cockpits of modern Airliner cockpits, where Crew Resource Management* techniques have been applied to bring about the same sort of excellent flight safety results as did this same ideology of team work lead to such astoundingly brilliant results at the Skunk Works.

ABOUT the presenter: Nickolas Means: Nick hails from Austin, TX, the Taco Capital of the World.

When he’s not busy eating tacos, he’s the VP of Engineering at Muve Health, working with an incredibly talented team of developers to change how healthcare is delivered and paid for in the US. He’s a huge believer that software development is mostly human interaction and that empathy is the key to building great software.  He is also an enthusiastic promoter and believer in the new Airline Pilot training scheme called Crew (or Cockpit) Resource Management.*

*Crew resource management or cockpit resource management (CRM) is a set of training procedures for use in environments where human error can have devastating effects. Used primarily for improving air safety, CRM focuses on interpersonal communication, leadership, and decision making in the cockpit.

What the Jenny Started Here – Some Peeks at Life in Space

First, a short look at typical daily life at the International Space Station.  5:30 minutes long.

And, a more detailed visit to the space station.  This is 28:58 minutes in length and our tour guide is U.S. Astronaut, Captain Sunita “Sunny” Williams, USN, Retired.

From Virg Hemphill – Take a Ride Along with the Blue Angels

Aviation Scout Virg Hemphill

No need to add much text to this one-of-a-kind video clip of the one-and-only Navy’s Blue Angels Exhibition Team at work.

From the slot position to the lead aircraft – and then from number one’s belly, you get views once unheard of.  Amazing videography, not to mention aerobatic precision.

These barrel rolls, loops, inverted climbing turns and “bursting bomb” maneuvers are breathtaking from the deck, but from onboard these sleek McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornets your view is really spectacular.  This video was taken just last month over Puget Sound as the Blues performed over Seattle Washington’s annual Boeing SeaFair Air Show 2019.

We’ve put a composite photo down below showing the different aircraft used by the “Blues” since they first began to thrill the crowds at the end of WWII.  The main video is only 6:19 long.

Don’t hesitate to enjoy this high-resolution video in full-screen mode.

Click the above and below group shots to see them in full resolution.

The 2019 Team Members pose for the official group portrait. Click on the photo to see their names at their web site.

FASF Member, Lt. Col. Wendy Woodard, Briefs EP Daedalians

Colonel Woodard commands the AFROTC Detachment at New Mexico State University (NMSU) in Las Cruces, NM. This clip is of some of her briefing to the El Paso, TX Daedalian Flight 24 about the role of the Air Force ROTC towards helping build leaders for the U.S. Air Force.  She, as are all of the El Paso Flight Daedalians, is an active member of the FASF.  Two other active members were also Commanders of the same AFROTC Detachment at NMSU: Colonel Alan Fisher, and current Trustee, Colonel Ira Cline.  Col. Fisher is also a member of the El Paso Daedalian Flight 24.  Here is a short (3 Minute) video clip of some of Colonel Woodard’s Presentation:

Here, below, are some photographs taken at last week’s Daedalian event:

[Click on any of below photos to see it in full high resolution]

L to R: Col. Woodard, Roger Springstead and Mary Barnes chat before the meeting convened.

L to R: Virgil Hemphill engaged in “hangar talk” with Col. Woodard.

L to R: Dave Ginn & Larry Spradlin.

L to R: Colonel Bob Pitt describes upcoming Daedalian events while Virgil Hemphill and Col. Woodard listen.

       Colonel Woodard begins her briefing.

The Colonel makes another “thumbs-up” positive point.

L to R:  Waiter, Enrique, Mayre Sue Overstreet, Col. Bob and Julie Pitt, Virg HemphillCol. Woodard –  Col. & Judy Campos, Mary Barnes, Roger Springstead and Col. Alan Fisher.

L to R: Ric Lambart looks on as Colonel Woodard happily accepts her award from Flight Capt. Col. Mario Campos.

Lieutenant Colonel Wendy A. Woodard (L) assumed the duties of Commander, Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) Detachment 505, New Mexico State University (NMSU), in June 2018. Her duties include leading and overseeing all training activities and academic courses for all current cadets. Furthermore, she is the Department Head and Professor of Aerospace Studies for all AS400-level cadets.

Col. Woodard entered the Air Force in 1997 after earning her bachelor’s degrees in History and Humanities from the United States Air Force Academy.

After completing pilot training, Col. Woodard was a B-52H (see photo below) pilot at Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana.

USAF B-52H Heavy Bomber turns on final approach to land.

KC-10A Tanker (DC 10) refueling F-16

KC-10 “Extender” (DC-10) Air to Air refueling flight of F-16s.

In 2001, she qualified in the KC-10A (above) and performed multiple deployments to Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, and Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. During these deployments, she amassed 580 combat flight hours over Afghanistan.

Lt. Colonel Woodard was then assigned to the United States Air Force Academy as a T-10

Gliders help future Air Force leaders soar

A TG-10B glider lifts into the air at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colo. (USAF photo/David Armer)

sailplane instructor pilot (see above USAF photo). Between 2004 and 2012, she flew over 900 glider sorties, served as the Group Sailplane Site Chief, was a Standardization and Evaluation pilot at the Group level, and was selected to serve as a Deputy Group Air Officer Commanding for Cadet Group Two. In 2008, she transitioned into the Air Force Reserve and earned her master’s degree in Counseling and Leadership at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs.

Beechcraft T-1A Jet

In 2012, the Colonel was assigned to Air Force Reserve Command Headquarters at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, as the Chief of Protocol for the 3-star Commander, Air Force Reserve Command. She supported high-visibility visits from the Secretary of the Air Force, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force and the Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force. In 2015, she was selected to serve as the Chief of Plans and Programs for a Flying Training Group at Joint Base San Antonio – Randolph, where she was also a T-1A (above) instructor pilot. In 2018, she returned to active duty to assume command of AFROTC Detachment 505.

First All Female Pilot Flight Crew Fly Into Hurricane Dorian

Breaking news as Hurricane Dorian threatens to hit Florida.

LAKELAND, FL – Reconnaissance Jet prepares for a Hurricane reconnaissance mission with the first all female three-pilot flight crew on board.

Featuring (R to L above) Capt. Kristie Twining, Commander Rebecca Waddington, and Lt. Lindsey Norman.

Get the latest forecast information at http://hurricanes.gov .